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Friday, December 13, 2019 - 10:30

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  • 408

    Avision self-service copier is a unique product in the market. It can provide the printing and copy service in public areas such as airport, government offices, banks, schools, libraries and hotels. People will be able to print and copy by searching for Avision SSC nearby. In the first year itself, we plan to set up 3,000 locations and within three years to 10,000 units.

    Taiwan-based Avision has launched what it claims to be the world's first self-service copier (SSC) machine in India. Designed for the Indian market, the X2030 self-service copier integrates cloud printing, mobile payment and IoT technology to offer printing and copy service to the public, eliminating the need for a computer or service personnel.

    Making the copier easy to operate, the machine will have a 4.3-inch colour touchscreen display. One doesn't need to connect it to an Ethernet cable. Now, it has been Wi-Fi-enabled (4G). The machine will be equipped with high-yield 4,000-page toner cartridges, will have a 250-sheet capacity tray and can print up to 30 copies per minute. It will also support mobile, cloud and USB printing and ID card copying. The machines can work 24/7.

    Claire Sung, Marketing Head, Avision says, "Avision self-service copier is a unique product in the market. It can provide the printing and copy service in public areas such as airport, government offices, banks, schools, libraries and hotels. People will be able to print and copy by searching for Avision SSC nearby. In the first year itself, we plan to set up 3,000 locations and within three years to 10,000 units." As Avision and its partners will invest in the copiers and system, the company expects to break even by six to 12 months.
    Most end-users in the country don't invest in a printer/copier because cartridges run dry quickly if not used regularly. Users often rely on the local photocopy and document-printing shops set up in every locality.  

     

     

    Mon, 09/12/2019
  • 407

    The theme of the convention was ‘Quality Concepts for cultural breakthrough’

    The 28th Chapter Convention on Quality Circles, Koraput Chapter was organised by JK Paper Mills October 17 and 18 at SC Jain Memorial Hall in Jaykaypur here. Twenty-Nine Quality Circles/Allied Circles teams and delegates from Indian Rare Earth Ltd at Chhatarpur, JK Paper Mills at Jaykaypur, NALCO at Damanjodi, Utkal Aluminum Ltd at Tikri, Vedanta Alumina Ltd at Lanjigarh, Hoffincons at Jaykaypur and Fimakem India Ltd. at Rayagada participated in this meet and presented their case studies.
    The convention was inaugurated October 17 by chief guest Vinay Dwivedi, Vice President (Manufacturing), JK Paper Mills. Prabhakar Rao, head engineering, Vedanta Alumina Ltd, Lanjigarh and Ram Shankar Das, Secretary, QCFI- Bhubaneswar Chapter were the chief speaker and chief judge in this meet.
    The valedictory function was organised October 18 in which Rabi Shankar Das, executive director, NALCO, Damanjodi graced the occasion as the chief guest. Biswajit Dwivedi, vice-president (commercial), of JK Paper Mills was the Guest of Honour. 
    The winning teams were given away prizes. Quality circle ‘Gloss’ from JK Paper Mills got the ‘Best of the Best’ award in this convention. All the participating quality circles and allied quality circles bagged the gold category award.
    Source: www.orissapost.com

     

    Sun, 08/12/2019

Special Feature

  • 410

    We were different. Brands found it welcoming that there was someone willing to pay that 70 percent duty and buy. Our margins were limited to 15 to 20 percent in the early days, but we were setting up a business and getting products customers wanted. Modern retail was picking up, malls had started emerging, and disposable income was rising.

    In 2002, Bengaluru got a new fancy address for a stationery store: William Penn. Nikhil Ranjan launched William Penn with the idea of bringing in a lifestyle-driven stationery store to India, one that provided the touch-and-feel element.  

    Launched as a word-class alternative to the neighbourhood stationery store, Bengaluru-based William Penn now has its own label and products, tie-ups with premium brands like Cross, Waterman, and Sheaffer, and a turnover of Rs. 100 crore. 

    “Until then, a stationery store translated into small kirana-like stores, which didn’t have specific brands and premium appeal,” Nikhil says.
     A mechanical engineer from National Engineering College, Mysore, Nikhil had by then been placed at IBM. 

    However, he soon realised that neither software engineering was his cup of tea, nor was a regular nine-to-five job. Setting up a stationery store came naturally to Nikhil whose father has a manufacturing setup for stationery in Mysuru, which was established in 1987. But Nikhil wanted to do something different from the family business.  

    Started with an investment of Rs. 30-Rs 35 lakh, William Penn now has a turnover of Rs 100 crore. It offers its own pen brand PennLine, and has tie-ups with premium brands like Cross, Waterman, and Sheaffer to name a few. 

    Building the business from ground up 

    In the early days, Nikhil says the team was clueless on how to run a business. “We just knew there was an innate need for stationery and put things together, without even thinking of how the supply chain would work. What worked for us was that we were responding to what the customer wanted.” 
    “Initially, vendors supply to you only if you can guarantee certain volumes. And we can’t justify that. This is a challenge for any business,” Nikhil says. 

    He adds that getting the ‘yes’ from the vendors wasn’t a problem; the problem was after that. 
    The brand had now set up a complete distribution network and supply chain. But back then, the team had to start from scratch. Launched with seven people, William Penn is now a team of over 300 people.  

    Every brand was happy to have an inquiry and representation in India, but the price points and import duties surprised many.  In early 2000s, setting up a supply chain was tough as export duties were extremely high - upwards of 70 percent.  

    “We were different. Brands found it welcoming that there was someone willing to pay that 70 percent duty and buy. Our margins were limited to 15 to 20 percent in the early days, but we were setting up a business and getting products customers wanted. Modern retail was picking up, malls had started emerging, and disposable income was rising,” Nikhil says.  
    The first brand that William Penn helped succeed was Pelican, a German brand.  

    “I remember meeting the representative at the Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai. He was most excited about staying at the Taj. He was the export manager at Pelican and was retiring. He heard from me, and possibly thought of it as his last chance to visit India. He was clear that I had to meet him there. This was in 2003,” Nikhil recalls.  
    After Pelican came on board, other brands slowly started joining.  

    Focusing on retail 

    For the first couple of years, the team focused on retail; it opened its first store at Koramangala in Bengaluru, and second store at Forum Mall in Bengaluru in 2004.  Another external factor that helped in the growth of the business was the presence of e-mail, which helped the team reach out to different brands and vendors.  
    William Penn started becoming cash positive from the second year. It started with a revenue of Rs 2 crore.  

    In 2005, the team expanded to Mumbai to tap the residents’ huge spending power. By then, the company was also getting corporate orders, many of them from India’s commercial capital, and it made sense to open a store there. 

    William Penn’s team was now marketing products in print and on radio. The hoardings ensured that malls received good footfalls.  

    “We got a good break in 2007 when we got an opportunity to open our store at the Hyderabad airport. It gave us a lot of visibility. It helped us get a store at the Delhi airport in 2010,” Nikhil says.  

    B2B and the William Penn label  

    While the company was building physical stores, the team started getting B2B orders from iGate and ING Vysya for writing instruments and stationery.  
    Physical stores may have been the primary source of revenue when Nikhil started the business, but today they contribute a little less than 50 percent of the overall revenue; the rest is courtesy B2B and other channels.  In 2015, the team decided to launched its own pen brand: PennLine.  
    Nikhil says that in early 2000s international brands did not have the Indian consumer in mind while making products. “We saw this as an opportunity and the Indian market was maturing,” he says.  

    By then, William Penn was making revenues of Rs 75 crore.  

     

    Thu, 12/12/2019
  • 409

    In times when artificial intelligence, robotics, and virtual reality are making their presence felt in every sector, these five startups are using technology to mix entertainment with education.

    But as new-age as it might sound, edutainment is not an entirely novel concept. It has existed as part of oral tradition, in the form of fables and parables for ages, driving home key values and lessons to young learners. Only with time, these mediums have been taken over by tech tools, replacing traditional pedagogical techniques with gamified apps and storytelling with an interactive experience.

    Slow and steady for sure, but entrepreneurs closer to home have set the ball rolling for the Indian edutainment market. If the various market reports are any indication, at the moment, this sector accounts for a whopping $6 billion market share. And this vertical is only bound to grow from here, thanks to a renewed interest from a host of innovative domestic startups that have taken upon themselves to blur the lines between “Education with Entertainment”.

    At the heart of this segment, though, the idea remains the same: To make learning seamless by engaging students and young learners – mostly aged 12 and below – in fun and immersive experiences through the means of smartphones and other internet-connected devices, virtual reality-powered tools, and other gamified digital learning content.    
    Here’s a look at 5 such Indian startups who are bridging the gap between education and entertainment in India:

     

    Ontamo Entertainment – Ria Rabbit 

    That quality tech has penetrated deeper into the pockets of India 2.0 – or Bharat – when compared to quality education and good educational infrastructure shouldn’t come as a surprise. But what should indeed raise concern is how little thought is put into the curation of edutainment content for the youngest consumers in India, aged six and below. 
    Mumbai-based Ontamo Entertainment, which is dedicated to creating original, monetisable intellectual properties for all age groups across multiple channels, understood this concern and developed a premier product called Ria Rabbit. It is, as the company claims, India’s first age-appropriate, culturally relevant home-grown intellectual property for children in the age group of zero to six years.

    "Since young minds are especially impressionable, it is imperative to ensure that children are exposed to age appropriate content, The core idea is to offer an engaging and organic paradigm that captures the attention of our young audience while inculcating within them a passion for learning." - Co-founder and CEO of Ontamo Entertainment, Prashant Pinge.

     

    Panda & Wolf Holding – Eco-warriors 

    Why restrict the benefits of edutaiment to maths and sciences, when it can be used to create a deeper and long-lasting impact on young minds and raise awareness about the environment? With this in mind, husband-wife duo Veda and Brian Dean – the founders of Panda & Wolf Holding – created a mobile gaming app for children between the age of six and 11 to create an awareness about the environmental crisis across the world.Through an engaging storyline and immersive stages, the app – which has even received the patronage of UNESCO – informs young users about issues plaguing the environment like deforestation, waste pollution, and overconsumption.

    "We wanted to explain what pollution really is or how saving the environment or waste sorting can be done in a way that makes it interesting for kids, and more importantly, educates them, This mix of gamification and game-based learning in eco-warriors has proven to be effective when one wants to educate kids, and for us it is a better way to align technology and edutainment." - Founders of Panda & Wolf Holding, Veda and Brian Dean.

     

    ConveGenius  

    His ideas are reflected in his entrepreneurial endeavour as well. His edutainment startup, ConveGenius, launched in 2014, is creating pedagogical techniques and content that are entertaining, have inherent educational value, and incentivise kids to learn so as to have more fun. 

    The idea is to create an ecosystem that is designed to educate children by bringing in elements of fun, entertainment and associated rewards, simultaneously. And to do so, the startup aggregates content of all the best players in the market and makes it available in the right sequence and right manner.

    "Learning is driven by both intrinsic and extrinsic motivational methods. Just providing quality digital content ensures learning for only those kids who are intrinsically motivated to study, Kids who prefer playing, watching TV, and fun over learning have to be extrinsically motivated." -  Founder and CEO of ConveGenius, Jairaj Bhattacharya.

     

    Paper Boat Apps – Kiddopia  

    Contrary to conventional belief, gaming has been proven to work as a positive reinforcement in the learning process. Not only does it make the entire process more engaging but also boosts cognitive development in people, especially children. 

    This idea, having received validation from various researchers, has over time fuelled many a business prospect, one of them being children-focussed edutainment studio Paper Boat Apps. 

    The bootstrapped startup, founded in 2013 by husband-wife duo Anupam and Anshu Dhanuka, works towards building world-class edutainment apps for preschool kids.
     Their flagship product is the Kiddopia app, which offers a wide array of interactive games and activities that help foster self-expression, cognitive development, and social-emotional learning.

    Such has been the popularity of this model that Kiddopia currently boasts more than 2.5 million downloads globally with over one lakh active subscribers.

     

    Shirsa Labs 

    For Mumbai-born Sukhada Tendulkar, bittersweet memories of childhood served as a major inspiration when she embarked on the entrepreneurial path. Her aim was to create something that would leverage life-like simulations of the digital world to take children on virtual tours of varied concepts. 

    The result was Shirsa Labs - a quality digital platform for kids aged between five and 15 years with which they can play and get entertained while learning in an organic way. 

    Their offerings include Planet of GUI, which is a goal-oriented virtual world for kids with videos, games, and worksheets, NewsPIK, a digital newspaper for children, and also a B2B product to instill creativity in schools’ curricula.

     

    Wed, 11/12/2019

Industry People

  • 410

    We were different. Brands found it welcoming that there was someone willing to pay that 70 percent duty and buy. Our margins were limited to 15 to 20 percent in the early days, but we were setting up a business and getting products customers wanted. Modern retail was picking up, malls had started emerging, and disposable income was rising.

    In 2002, Bengaluru got a new fancy address for a stationery store: William Penn. Nikhil Ranjan launched William Penn with the idea of bringing in a lifestyle-driven stationery store to India, one that provided the touch-and-feel element.  

    Launched as a word-class alternative to the neighbourhood stationery store, Bengaluru-based William Penn now has its own label and products, tie-ups with premium brands like Cross, Waterman, and Sheaffer, and a turnover of Rs. 100 crore. 

    “Until then, a stationery store translated into small kirana-like stores, which didn’t have specific brands and premium appeal,” Nikhil says.
     A mechanical engineer from National Engineering College, Mysore, Nikhil had by then been placed at IBM. 

    However, he soon realised that neither software engineering was his cup of tea, nor was a regular nine-to-five job. Setting up a stationery store came naturally to Nikhil whose father has a manufacturing setup for stationery in Mysuru, which was established in 1987. But Nikhil wanted to do something different from the family business.  

    Started with an investment of Rs. 30-Rs 35 lakh, William Penn now has a turnover of Rs 100 crore. It offers its own pen brand PennLine, and has tie-ups with premium brands like Cross, Waterman, and Sheaffer to name a few. 

    Building the business from ground up 

    In the early days, Nikhil says the team was clueless on how to run a business. “We just knew there was an innate need for stationery and put things together, without even thinking of how the supply chain would work. What worked for us was that we were responding to what the customer wanted.” 
    “Initially, vendors supply to you only if you can guarantee certain volumes. And we can’t justify that. This is a challenge for any business,” Nikhil says. 

    He adds that getting the ‘yes’ from the vendors wasn’t a problem; the problem was after that. 
    The brand had now set up a complete distribution network and supply chain. But back then, the team had to start from scratch. Launched with seven people, William Penn is now a team of over 300 people.  

    Every brand was happy to have an inquiry and representation in India, but the price points and import duties surprised many.  In early 2000s, setting up a supply chain was tough as export duties were extremely high - upwards of 70 percent.  

    “We were different. Brands found it welcoming that there was someone willing to pay that 70 percent duty and buy. Our margins were limited to 15 to 20 percent in the early days, but we were setting up a business and getting products customers wanted. Modern retail was picking up, malls had started emerging, and disposable income was rising,” Nikhil says.  
    The first brand that William Penn helped succeed was Pelican, a German brand.  

    “I remember meeting the representative at the Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai. He was most excited about staying at the Taj. He was the export manager at Pelican and was retiring. He heard from me, and possibly thought of it as his last chance to visit India. He was clear that I had to meet him there. This was in 2003,” Nikhil recalls.  
    After Pelican came on board, other brands slowly started joining.  

    Focusing on retail 

    For the first couple of years, the team focused on retail; it opened its first store at Koramangala in Bengaluru, and second store at Forum Mall in Bengaluru in 2004.  Another external factor that helped in the growth of the business was the presence of e-mail, which helped the team reach out to different brands and vendors.  
    William Penn started becoming cash positive from the second year. It started with a revenue of Rs 2 crore.  

    In 2005, the team expanded to Mumbai to tap the residents’ huge spending power. By then, the company was also getting corporate orders, many of them from India’s commercial capital, and it made sense to open a store there. 

    William Penn’s team was now marketing products in print and on radio. The hoardings ensured that malls received good footfalls.  

    “We got a good break in 2007 when we got an opportunity to open our store at the Hyderabad airport. It gave us a lot of visibility. It helped us get a store at the Delhi airport in 2010,” Nikhil says.  

    B2B and the William Penn label  

    While the company was building physical stores, the team started getting B2B orders from iGate and ING Vysya for writing instruments and stationery.  
    Physical stores may have been the primary source of revenue when Nikhil started the business, but today they contribute a little less than 50 percent of the overall revenue; the rest is courtesy B2B and other channels.  In 2015, the team decided to launched its own pen brand: PennLine.  
    Nikhil says that in early 2000s international brands did not have the Indian consumer in mind while making products. “We saw this as an opportunity and the Indian market was maturing,” he says.  

    By then, William Penn was making revenues of Rs 75 crore.  

     

    Thu, 12/12/2019
  • 363

    Mr. P. C. Baid,  was based in Mumbai before he established Alpha International in 1989 in Hyderabad. Mr. Baid had an impressive experience of 10+years in      the realms of Importing and Marketing Writing and Technical Drawing Instruments from Germany, Japan, and other countries. Through his efforts and networking, Staedtler appointed Alpha International as the Sole Distributor for their products for the most part of India. Under the leadership of Mr. P. C. Baid   and the stewardship of his son Mr. Vikash Jain, Alpha International is now one of the top names in the list of suppliers in the country. The company understands and has consistently adapted itself to the volatile demands and business environment of the country, thus keeping the reputation and leadership status of Staedtler products 
    in the country.

    PSS: What has been your journey like with Staedtler in the country up to now?

    Mr. Vikash Jain: We - Alpha International was established in 1989. Initially we started as the distributor for Staedtler for most of part of the country, but were importing through a designated importer M/s. Continental Exporters, Bangalore for several reasons including the import license issue at the time. In 2001, given our association with Staedtler, we were appointed as the exclusive importer and distributor for their products in India.

            Staedtler initially began with technical drawing products – those in the field of engineering, architects and related were the main users. However, now the products cover a wider audience which includes students, professionals, and lifestyle products (high quality pens- fine liners, fountain pens, a premium range even in erasers & sharpeners).      

         Staedtler is 350 years old company and have built a wide range of end to end stationery products. Staedtler’s premium products are their best sellers Color pencils, Graphite pencils, fineliners, markers – several types of writing instruments. As a distributor we are extremely happy with the association since there are minimal complaints about the quality of the products. In fact consumers share personal stories at expos and exhibitions with regard to why they treasure Staedtler products. We are looking forward to meeting with consumers at the Stationery Expo from 11th to 15th September, this year at the Pragati Maidan.

    PSS: Is it still a niche market?

    Mr. V.J.: While the range of products has moved from 30-40 SKUs to about 350-400 SKUs, reaching out to a larger number of people, the products are still high end and hence niche.

    PSS: How does the Indian Market compare with the European Market?

    Mr. V.J.: The Indian Market is still small for Staedtler when compared with European market and few other Asian countries. As the distributor for Indian market, we make a small contribution to the overall turnover for Staedtler, and yet the behemoth company continues to extend their cooperation.

          We and they are hopeful that India will soon become a major contributor to their bottom line, given the sheer size and growth in population of the country. Additionally, the focus on education and government initiatives to increase the per capita income are two factors that add to the positivity.

    PSS:  How do you plan on making writing instruments affordable for more people?

    Mr. V.J.: Today, Staedtler products are prescribed for art, architecture or interior / fashion design students and they are expected to use these prescription products to get the desired results. Staedtler does not and will never compromise on quality and hence the pricing is unlikely to come down significantly for the current range. The company may come up with a range of products that would cater to a larger audience later on, but the quality would not be compromised.

    PSS: Is there any Make in India Plan from Staedtler?

    Mr. V.J.:  We feel as Staedtler has manufacturing facilities at Thailand and Indonesia in Asia, and hence in near future may not have plans to set up such a facility in India.

     

    Subscribe to read more... 

    Sat, 21/09/2019

New Products & Trends

  • 409

    In times when artificial intelligence, robotics, and virtual reality are making their presence felt in every sector, these five startups are using technology to mix entertainment with education.

    But as new-age as it might sound, edutainment is not an entirely novel concept. It has existed as part of oral tradition, in the form of fables and parables for ages, driving home key values and lessons to young learners. Only with time, these mediums have been taken over by tech tools, replacing traditional pedagogical techniques with gamified apps and storytelling with an interactive experience.

    Slow and steady for sure, but entrepreneurs closer to home have set the ball rolling for the Indian edutainment market. If the various market reports are any indication, at the moment, this sector accounts for a whopping $6 billion market share. And this vertical is only bound to grow from here, thanks to a renewed interest from a host of innovative domestic startups that have taken upon themselves to blur the lines between “Education with Entertainment”.

    At the heart of this segment, though, the idea remains the same: To make learning seamless by engaging students and young learners – mostly aged 12 and below – in fun and immersive experiences through the means of smartphones and other internet-connected devices, virtual reality-powered tools, and other gamified digital learning content.    
    Here’s a look at 5 such Indian startups who are bridging the gap between education and entertainment in India:

     

    Ontamo Entertainment – Ria Rabbit 

    That quality tech has penetrated deeper into the pockets of India 2.0 – or Bharat – when compared to quality education and good educational infrastructure shouldn’t come as a surprise. But what should indeed raise concern is how little thought is put into the curation of edutainment content for the youngest consumers in India, aged six and below. 
    Mumbai-based Ontamo Entertainment, which is dedicated to creating original, monetisable intellectual properties for all age groups across multiple channels, understood this concern and developed a premier product called Ria Rabbit. It is, as the company claims, India’s first age-appropriate, culturally relevant home-grown intellectual property for children in the age group of zero to six years.

    "Since young minds are especially impressionable, it is imperative to ensure that children are exposed to age appropriate content, The core idea is to offer an engaging and organic paradigm that captures the attention of our young audience while inculcating within them a passion for learning." - Co-founder and CEO of Ontamo Entertainment, Prashant Pinge.

     

    Panda & Wolf Holding – Eco-warriors 

    Why restrict the benefits of edutaiment to maths and sciences, when it can be used to create a deeper and long-lasting impact on young minds and raise awareness about the environment? With this in mind, husband-wife duo Veda and Brian Dean – the founders of Panda & Wolf Holding – created a mobile gaming app for children between the age of six and 11 to create an awareness about the environmental crisis across the world.Through an engaging storyline and immersive stages, the app – which has even received the patronage of UNESCO – informs young users about issues plaguing the environment like deforestation, waste pollution, and overconsumption.

    "We wanted to explain what pollution really is or how saving the environment or waste sorting can be done in a way that makes it interesting for kids, and more importantly, educates them, This mix of gamification and game-based learning in eco-warriors has proven to be effective when one wants to educate kids, and for us it is a better way to align technology and edutainment." - Founders of Panda & Wolf Holding, Veda and Brian Dean.

     

    ConveGenius  

    His ideas are reflected in his entrepreneurial endeavour as well. His edutainment startup, ConveGenius, launched in 2014, is creating pedagogical techniques and content that are entertaining, have inherent educational value, and incentivise kids to learn so as to have more fun. 

    The idea is to create an ecosystem that is designed to educate children by bringing in elements of fun, entertainment and associated rewards, simultaneously. And to do so, the startup aggregates content of all the best players in the market and makes it available in the right sequence and right manner.

    "Learning is driven by both intrinsic and extrinsic motivational methods. Just providing quality digital content ensures learning for only those kids who are intrinsically motivated to study, Kids who prefer playing, watching TV, and fun over learning have to be extrinsically motivated." -  Founder and CEO of ConveGenius, Jairaj Bhattacharya.

     

    Paper Boat Apps – Kiddopia  

    Contrary to conventional belief, gaming has been proven to work as a positive reinforcement in the learning process. Not only does it make the entire process more engaging but also boosts cognitive development in people, especially children. 

    This idea, having received validation from various researchers, has over time fuelled many a business prospect, one of them being children-focussed edutainment studio Paper Boat Apps. 

    The bootstrapped startup, founded in 2013 by husband-wife duo Anupam and Anshu Dhanuka, works towards building world-class edutainment apps for preschool kids.
     Their flagship product is the Kiddopia app, which offers a wide array of interactive games and activities that help foster self-expression, cognitive development, and social-emotional learning.

    Such has been the popularity of this model that Kiddopia currently boasts more than 2.5 million downloads globally with over one lakh active subscribers.

     

    Shirsa Labs 

    For Mumbai-born Sukhada Tendulkar, bittersweet memories of childhood served as a major inspiration when she embarked on the entrepreneurial path. Her aim was to create something that would leverage life-like simulations of the digital world to take children on virtual tours of varied concepts. 

    The result was Shirsa Labs - a quality digital platform for kids aged between five and 15 years with which they can play and get entertained while learning in an organic way. 

    Their offerings include Planet of GUI, which is a goal-oriented virtual world for kids with videos, games, and worksheets, NewsPIK, a digital newspaper for children, and also a B2B product to instill creativity in schools’ curricula.

     

    Wed, 11/12/2019
  • 408

    Avision self-service copier is a unique product in the market. It can provide the printing and copy service in public areas such as airport, government offices, banks, schools, libraries and hotels. People will be able to print and copy by searching for Avision SSC nearby. In the first year itself, we plan to set up 3,000 locations and within three years to 10,000 units.

    Taiwan-based Avision has launched what it claims to be the world's first self-service copier (SSC) machine in India. Designed for the Indian market, the X2030 self-service copier integrates cloud printing, mobile payment and IoT technology to offer printing and copy service to the public, eliminating the need for a computer or service personnel.

    Making the copier easy to operate, the machine will have a 4.3-inch colour touchscreen display. One doesn't need to connect it to an Ethernet cable. Now, it has been Wi-Fi-enabled (4G). The machine will be equipped with high-yield 4,000-page toner cartridges, will have a 250-sheet capacity tray and can print up to 30 copies per minute. It will also support mobile, cloud and USB printing and ID card copying. The machines can work 24/7.

    Claire Sung, Marketing Head, Avision says, "Avision self-service copier is a unique product in the market. It can provide the printing and copy service in public areas such as airport, government offices, banks, schools, libraries and hotels. People will be able to print and copy by searching for Avision SSC nearby. In the first year itself, we plan to set up 3,000 locations and within three years to 10,000 units." As Avision and its partners will invest in the copiers and system, the company expects to break even by six to 12 months.
    Most end-users in the country don't invest in a printer/copier because cartridges run dry quickly if not used regularly. Users often rely on the local photocopy and document-printing shops set up in every locality.  

     

     

    Mon, 09/12/2019

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